05.25.13 Wellness

Busy Philipps: Body Image

BY The Conversation Team

Busy Philipps

This week on The Conversation we’re talking with actress Busy Philipps. In this episode, Busy talks about…

The treatment of pregnant women in the media.

Her personal struggles with body image.

Being asked to lose weight for her career.

Our questions for you… 

1) Would you say you have a healthy relationship with your body?

2) Does the media’s representation of women damage your self-esteem in any way? If so, how?

3) Have you struggled with your own body image? Where are you at with it now?

4) What is one thing you could commit to daily to show your body some love?

Share your answers, thoughts and questions with us in the comments section below. 

The Editorial Team - The Conversation’s mission is to explore, nurture and empower the modern woman, through interviews and topics ranging from: health and wellness, beauty, style, fitness, diet, parenting, sex, love, truth and wisdom, career and finance. We are here to share and support the universal language of women. Join The Conversation, find us on Facebook and Twitter @TheConversation.

Comments

  • olithee

    definetely a good one, Busy is such a funny person.

    how come do we know better like Amanda says and still keep judging and being hard on ourselves ?

    I guess changes in minds are gonna come thanks to open and honest discussions like this one, in which we re-define the truth.
    It is a tough backtrack tough because it is easy to agree on today beauty concepts and to judge and a way harder to embrace tolerance and confidence.

    these conversation communities that we have here and there are a chance, thanks

  • CMH

    6 minutes Amanda!!
    It’s not enough!!

  • justme98247

    I absolutely love what Busy said about the hair. I feel the same way. I want my girls (8 and twins that are 6) to have a healthly relationship with bodies and hair is suppose to be down there!

    1) Would you say you have a healthy relationship with your body? I use to have a healthy relationship with my body…but in the last couple years it’s been a struggle. I am 44 and the weight doesnt go away as quickly as it use to. In my twenties i could pretty much eat anything and I’d stay the same in my 30’s I worked outoff and on and I liked the way I looked but now it seems like I really need to watch what I eat and exercise regualrly. I am sure not where I would like to be but I am trying.

    2) Does the media’s representation of women damage your self-esteem in any way? If so, how? I dont really pay that much attention to it. I just know what I need to do in order to be healthy. I do like to look at fitness magazines for inspiration but I know that in order to achieve that look I would have to make it a full time job and get a trailer!

    3) Have you struggled with your own body image? Where are you at with it now? I havent struggled until now. I just wish the middle thickness would go away! I keep it to myself too..maybe complain a little to the husband but I have 3 little girls and I dont want to make an issue of in front of them. I just try to buy healthy foods for us all to eat and make exercise fun…soccer in the back yard or obstacle courses to run etc. They even like to do exercise videos with me. Or we’ll stop and do 10 push ups for no good reason!

    4) What is one thing you could commit to daily to show your body some love? get that heart rate up doing something fun!

  • Adel

    (because this is a text post, my current mood isn’t angry. just maybe a little hurt? deflated? and mellow.)
    have to comment on this bit of the interview when you mentioned “until women on tv look more normal…”
    i think it is equally damaging to call thin people (whether they are naturally thin or whether it’s due to a sickness) abnormal, which is what that suggests. i am a really tiny person. people often ask if i eat enough or comment that i’m very thin. i used to work at a gym, and when i would make plans with my co-workers to exercise after our shift, eaves droppers would say that we didn’t need to exercise because we were already thin. but what they didn’t realise is that i got winded going up one flight of stairs and was miserable and lived a very sedentary lifestyle. i still feel bad about working out and worry all the time if i’m eating “enough” to please other people… instead of listening to when my body says it’s full. (like right now. i’m eating breakfast. i’m full and have half a pancake left and i’m forcing myself to eat it. why? why am i doing this?) everyone’s body type is normal and unique and beautiful and i do understand the desire for having more body types in the media, i want that too. but we also don’t want to suggest there’s anything wrong with being thin. eat when you’re hungry, stop when you’re done, don’t puke it up, find a way to keep moving that makes you happy and not dread exercise, love the shit out of your brilliant body that does so many awesome things, and don’t compare yours to someone else. “the grass is greener where you water it”

    • I fully agree with you . In fact i tweeted a few days ago about how it is not ok to shame naturally thin people . My point is that the majority of women who have a job on Tv feel a huge pressure to be super thin ( I know I do ) and there needs to be more representation of women who are not larger , not thinner but AVERAGE then there will be more balance . My apologies if the word normal infers that you are not normal . I was referring to my personal normal which is where i am at in this interview . Healthy is all that matters , whatever size that is for you .

    • SusanneNYC

      As a naturally thin woman, I didn’t have a problem with Amanda’s comment about the need for women on TV to look normal. I understood it to mean wanting women’s bodies to reflect what their true body types are in all our various sizes and not a manufactured (or excessively dieted) version of it. I also follow Amanda on Twitter and did see her comment about not shaming naturally thin women and I even responded to it. I have experienced mean comments all my life because of my body size. In fact, I didn’t weigh over 100 lbs until I was in my 30’s, yet I had naturally size 34C breasts so people have for years joked about all my body fat being in my breasts. There is definitely a mentality amongst society that its OK to make fun of thin people, even right to our faces because it isn’t considered discrimination or hurtful, when it actually is. But as for Amanda’s comment, I think it was about the pressure placed on women to look a certain way and not meant to be negative to any authentic female body type.

  • Megan

    Loved this one and love Busy Phillips! I too, wish these were longer, as I get so much out of them. Thank you Amanda for doing what you’re doing! These interviews with wonderful women are inspiring!

  • Dawn L

    LOVE your show Amanda!! Thank you!!!

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